0
We're unable to sign you in at this time. Please try again in a few minutes.
Retry
We were able to sign you in, but your subscription(s) could not be found. Please try again in a few minutes.
Retry
There may be a problem with your account. Please contact the AMA Service Center to resolve this issue.
Contact the AMA Service Center:
Telephone: 1 (800) 262-2350 or 1 (312) 670-7827  *   Email: subscriptions@jamanetwork.com
Error Message ......
Original Investigation |

Prevalence of Domestic Violence Among Trauma Patients

Bellal Joseph, MD1; Mazhar Khalil, MD1; Bardiya Zangbar, MD1; Narong Kulvatunyou, MD1; Tahereh Orouji, MD1; Viraj Pandit, MD1; Terence O’Keeffe, MB, ChB1; Andrew Tang, MD1; Lynn Gries, MD1; Randall S. Friese, MD1; Peter Rhee, MD, MPH1; James W. Davis, MD2
[+] Author Affiliations
1Division of Trauma, Emergency Surgery, Critical Care, and Burns, Department of Surgery, University of Arizona, Tucson
2Division of Acute Care Surgery/Critical Care, Department of Surgery, University of California, San Francisco–Fresno Medical Education Program, Fresno
JAMA Surg. 2015;150(12):1177-1183. doi:10.1001/jamasurg.2015.2386.
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Importance  Domestic violence is an extremely underreported crime and a growing social problem in the United States. However, the true burden of the problem remains unknown.

Objective  To assess the reported prevalence of domestic violence among trauma patients.

Design, Setting, and Participants  A 6-year (2007-2012) retrospective analysis of the prospectively maintained National Trauma Data Bank. Trauma patients who experienced domestic violence and who presented to trauma centers participating in the National Trauma Data Bank were identified using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision diagnosis codes (995.80-995.85, 995.50, 995.52-995.55, and 995.59) and E codes (E967.0-E967.9). Patients were stratified by age into 3 groups: children (≤18 years), adults (19-54 years), and elderly patients (≥55 years). Trend analysis was performed on April 10, 2014, to assess the reported prevalence of domestic violence over the years.

Participants  Trauma patients presenting to trauma centers participating in the National Trauma Data Bank.

Main Outcomes and Measures  To assess the reported prevalence of domestic violence among trauma patients.

Results  A total of 16 575 trauma patients who experienced domestic violence were included. Of these trauma patients, 10 224 (61.7%) were children, 5503 (33.2%) were adults, and 848 (5.1%) were elderly patients. The mean (SD) age was 15.9 (20.6), the mean (SD) Injury Severity Score was 10.9 (9.6), and 8397 (50.7%) were male patients. Head injuries (46.8% of patients) and extremity fractures (31.2% of patients) were the most common injuries. A total of 12 515 patients (75.1%) were discharged home, and the overall mortality rate was 5.9% (n = 980). The overall reported prevalence of domestic violence among trauma patients was 5.7 cases per 1000 trauma center discharges. The prevalence of domestic violence increased among children (14.0 cases per 1000 trauma center discharges in 2007 to 18.5 case per 1000 trauma center discharges in 2012; P = .001) and adults (3.2 cases per 1000 discharges in 2007 to 4.5 cases per 1000 discharges in 2012; P = .001) over the 6-year period and remained unchanged for elderly patients (0.8 cases per 1000 discharges in 2007 to 0.96 cases per 1000 discharges in 2012; P = .09). On subanalysis of adults and elderly patients, the prevalence of domestic violence increased among both female (4.6 cases per 1000 discharges in 2007 to 5.3 cases per 1000 discharges in 2012; P = .001) and male patients (1.5 cases per 1000 discharges in 2007 to 2.8 cases per 1000 discharges in 2012; P = .001).

Conclusions and Relevance  Domestic violence is prevalent among trauma patients. Over the years, the reported prevalence of domestic violence has been increasing among children and adults, and continues to remain high among female trauma patients. A robust mandatory screening for evaluating domestic violence among trauma patients, along with a focused national intervention, is warranted.

Figures in this Article

Sign in

Purchase Options

• Buy this article
• Subscribe to the journal
• Rent this article ?

Figures

Place holder to copy figure label and caption
Figure 1.
Incidence of Domestic Violence per 1000 Trauma Center Discharges
Graphic Jump Location
Place holder to copy figure label and caption
Figure 2.
Trends in Domestic Violence Among Children, Adults, and Elderly Patients Over the Years
Graphic Jump Location
Place holder to copy figure label and caption
Figure 3.
Trends in Domestic Violence Among Male and Female Adults Over the Years
Graphic Jump Location

Tables

References

Correspondence

CME
Also Meets CME requirements for:
Browse CME for all U.S. States
Accreditation Information
The American Medical Association is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The AMA designates this journal-based CME activity for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM per course. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. Physicians who complete the CME course and score at least 80% correct on the quiz are eligible for AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM.
Note: You must get at least of the answers correct to pass this quiz.
Please click the checkbox indicating that you have read the full article in order to submit your answers.
Your answers have been saved for later.
You have not filled in all the answers to complete this quiz
The following questions were not answered:
Sorry, you have unsuccessfully completed this CME quiz with a score of
The following questions were not answered correctly:
Commitment to Change (optional):
Indicate what change(s) you will implement in your practice, if any, based on this CME course.
Your quiz results:
The filled radio buttons indicate your responses. The preferred responses are highlighted
For CME Course: A Proposed Model for Initial Assessment and Management of Acute Heart Failure Syndromes
Indicate what changes(s) you will implement in your practice, if any, based on this CME course.

Multimedia

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

530 Views
0 Citations
×

Sign in

Purchase Options

• Buy this article
• Subscribe to the journal
• Rent this article ?

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Articles Related By Topic
Related Collections
PubMed Articles
Jobs
brightcove.createExperiences();