0
We're unable to sign you in at this time. Please try again in a few minutes.
Retry
We were able to sign you in, but your subscription(s) could not be found. Please try again in a few minutes.
Retry
There may be a problem with your account. Please contact the AMA Service Center to resolve this issue.
Contact the AMA Service Center:
Telephone: 1 (800) 262-2350 or 1 (312) 670-7827  *   Email: subscriptions@jamanetwork.com
Error Message ......
Moments in Surgical History |

Mary Edwards Walker

Ira M. Rutkow, MD, MPH, DRPH
Arch Surg. 2000;135(4):489. doi:10.1001/archsurg.135.4.489.
Text Size: A A A
Published online

Extract

BORN IN OSWEGO TOWN, NY, in 1832, Mary Walker is one of America's more eccentric and intriguing medical personalities. Long determined to become a physician, in an era when medicine was not a generally approved calling for women, she entered Syracuse Medical College, Syracuse, NY, and after a little more than 12 months of study was awarded an MD degree (1855). Walker soon married a former medical school classmate, Albert E. Miller, and moved to Rome, NY, where she and her husband practiced together. A life-long nonconformist, Walker wore trousers and a dress-coat at the wedding, insisted on the omission of the usual promise to honor and obey, and went by her maiden name.

Figures in this Article

Topics

walkers

Sign in

Create a free personal account to sign up for alerts, share articles, and more.

Purchase Options

• Buy this article
• Subscribe to the journal

First Page Preview

View Large
First page PDF preview

Figures

Place holder to copy figure label and caption

Mary Walker was honored by the US Postal Service in 1982. This is the only American commemorative stamp ever issued with the word "surgeon" on it.

Graphic Jump Location

Tables

References

Correspondence

CME
Meets CME requirements for:
Browse CME for all U.S. States
Accreditation Information
The American Medical Association is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The AMA designates this journal-based CME activity for a maximum of 1 AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM per course. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. Physicians who complete the CME course and score at least 80% correct on the quiz are eligible for AMA PRA Category 1 CreditTM.
Note: You must get at least of the answers correct to pass this quiz.
You have not filled in all the answers to complete this quiz
The following questions were not answered:
Sorry, you have unsuccessfully completed this CME quiz with a score of
The following questions were not answered correctly:
Commitment to Change (optional):
Indicate what change(s) you will implement in your practice, if any, based on this CME course.
Your quiz results:
The filled radio buttons indicate your responses. The preferred responses are highlighted
For CME Course: A Proposed Model for Initial Assessment and Management of Acute Heart Failure Syndromes
Indicate what changes(s) you will implement in your practice, if any, based on this CME course.
Submit a Comment

Multimedia

Some tools below are only available to our subscribers or users with an online account.

Web of Science® Times Cited: 1

Sign in

Create a free personal account to sign up for alerts, share articles, and more.

Purchase Options

• Buy this article
• Subscribe to the journal

Related Content

Customize your page view by dragging & repositioning the boxes below.

Articles Related By Topic
Related Collections
PubMed Articles
Anomalous diffusion of self-propelled particles in directed random environments. Phys Rev E Stat Nonlin Soft Matter Phys 2014;90(3-1):030701.
DNAzyme-based biosensors and nanodevices. Chem Commun (Camb) Published online Oct 22, 2014.;
Jobs
brightcove.createExperiences();