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[+] Author Affiliations

Section Editor: Grace S. Rozycki, MD


Arch Surg. 2004;139(6):687-688. doi:10.1001/archsurg.139.6.688.
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ANSWER: GASTRIC DUPLICATION CYST

Place holder to copy figure label and caption
Figure 1.

A contrast-enhanced single-slice spiral computed tomographic scan of the abdomen demonstrating a 7 × 5-cm cystic lesion with serous fluid–filled appearance. The mass was located dorsal to the stomach.

Graphic Jump Location
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Figure 2.Histologic view of the septum between the stomach and duplication cyst. The stomach is lined with fundal mucosa (small arrow), and the duplication cyst is lined with antral mucosa (large arrow). Note the simplified appearance of the epithelium of the duplication cyst, with discrete, nonspecific signs of chronic inflammation (hematoxylin-eosin, original magnification ×5.5).

Graphic Jump Location

Gastric duplications are relatively rare, constituting approximately 4% to 10% of all gastrointestinal duplications and having a male-female ratio of 2:1.1,2Several theories explain the embryonic development of gastric duplications, but no single theory adequately explains all types of duplications. In 1959, Rowling3proposed 3 morphologic criteria for the correct diagnosis of gastric duplication cysts. First, the cyst must be attached to the stomach and contiguous with its wall. Second, the cyst must be surrounded by at least 1 coat of smooth muscle, fusing with the muscularis propria of the stomach. Third, the cyst must be lined with typical gastric mucosa. Most gastric duplications are noncommunicating, cystic in nature, and situated along the greater curvature.2Because of the unspecific clinical symptoms, gastric duplications are usually diagnosed by surgical means. Nevertheless, preoperative imaging may be helpful in determining the diagnosis. Plain films and barium studies may suggest a mass by impression or displacement signs, but ultrasonography is needed to assess the nature and size of the mass.4In the patient described, ultrasonography was also performed and showed a thick-walled cyst containing echogenic material. It was not clear, however, from which organ the cyst originated. As in other reports,4,5our computed tomographic scan suggested duplication cyst of the stomach but could not exclude pancreatic pseudocyst or omental cyst. Magnetic resonance images were able to show the cyst as being separate from the pancreas, thereby raising the suspicion for gastric duplication cyst. The final diagnosis was based on a combination of preoperative imaging and surgical and histologic findings, for which all are requisite.

Corresponding author: Clark J. Zeebregts, MD, Department of Surgery, University Hospital Groningen, PO Box 30001, 9700 RB Groningen, the Netherlands (e-mail: czeebregts@hotmail.com).

Agha  FPGabriele  OFAbdulla  FH Complete gastric duplication. AJR Am J Roentgenol. 1981;137406- 407
PubMed Link to Article
Macpherson  RI Gastrointestinal tract duplications: clinical, pathologic, etiologic, and radiologic considerations. Radiographics. 1993;131063- 1080
PubMed Link to Article
Rowling  JT Some observations on gastric cysts. Br J Surg. 1959;46441- 445
PubMed Link to Article
Dittrich  JRSpottswood  SEJolles  PR Gastric duplication cyst: scintigraphy and correlative imaging. Clin Nucl Med. 1997;2293- 96
PubMed Link to Article
Gupta  AKBerry  MMitra  DK Gastric duplication cyst in children: report of two cases. Pediatr Radiol. 1994;24346- 347
PubMed Link to Article

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Due to the overwhelmingly positive response to the "Image of the Month," the Archives of Surgeryhas temporarily discontinued accepting submissions for this feature. It is anticipated that requests for submissions will resume in mid 2004. Thank you.

Figures

Place holder to copy figure label and caption
Figure 1.

A contrast-enhanced single-slice spiral computed tomographic scan of the abdomen demonstrating a 7 × 5-cm cystic lesion with serous fluid–filled appearance. The mass was located dorsal to the stomach.

Graphic Jump Location
Place holder to copy figure label and caption

Figure 2.Histologic view of the septum between the stomach and duplication cyst. The stomach is lined with fundal mucosa (small arrow), and the duplication cyst is lined with antral mucosa (large arrow). Note the simplified appearance of the epithelium of the duplication cyst, with discrete, nonspecific signs of chronic inflammation (hematoxylin-eosin, original magnification ×5.5).

Graphic Jump Location

Tables

References

Agha  FPGabriele  OFAbdulla  FH Complete gastric duplication. AJR Am J Roentgenol. 1981;137406- 407
PubMed Link to Article
Macpherson  RI Gastrointestinal tract duplications: clinical, pathologic, etiologic, and radiologic considerations. Radiographics. 1993;131063- 1080
PubMed Link to Article
Rowling  JT Some observations on gastric cysts. Br J Surg. 1959;46441- 445
PubMed Link to Article
Dittrich  JRSpottswood  SEJolles  PR Gastric duplication cyst: scintigraphy and correlative imaging. Clin Nucl Med. 1997;2293- 96
PubMed Link to Article
Gupta  AKBerry  MMitra  DK Gastric duplication cyst in children: report of two cases. Pediatr Radiol. 1994;24346- 347
PubMed Link to Article

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