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Special Feature |

Image of the Month–Quiz Case FREE

George A. Poultsides, MD; Sabino Zani, MD; G. Peter Bloom, MD; Darren S. Tishler, MD
[+] Author Affiliations

Author Affiliations:Department of Surgery, Hartford Hospital, University of Connecticut School of Medicine, Hartford.


Section Editor: Carl E. Bredenberg, MD


Arch Surg. 2009;144(3):287-288. doi:10.1001/archsurg.2008.551-a.
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A 67-year-old woman came to the emergency department with worsening epigastric pain, bilious emesis, and obstipation during the previous 3 days. She denied having had similar symptoms in the past. She was otherwise healthy and had no history of previous abdominal operations. Physical examination revealed a soft, distended abdomen with mild epigastric tenderness. No abdominal wall hernias were noted. Laboratory studies showed leukocytosis (white blood cell count, 26.4/μL [to convert to ×109/L, multiply by 0.001]). Abdominal radiographs were significant for gastric dilatation only. Findings from computed tomography of the abdomen were suggestive of an internal hernia (Figure 1). After intravenous fluid resuscitation and nasogastric tube decompression, the patient underwent laparoscopic exploration. An internal hernia was diagnosed and repaired laparoscopically (Figure 2).

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Figure 1.

Abdominal computed tomography demonstrated gastric and duodenal dilatation and a saclike cluster of small-bowel loops interposed between the stomach and the pancreatic tail. The distal small bowel and colon were decompressed.

Graphic Jump Location

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Figure 2.

Intraoperative view of the internal hernia orifice lateral to the duodenojejunal flexure after reduction of 90 cm of viable herniated jejunum.

Graphic Jump Location

WHAT IS THE DIAGNOSIS?

A. Foramen of Winslow hernia

B. Right paraduodenal hernia

C. Left paraduodenal hernia

D. Transmesocolic hernia

Figures

Place holder to copy figure label and caption
Figure 1.

Abdominal computed tomography demonstrated gastric and duodenal dilatation and a saclike cluster of small-bowel loops interposed between the stomach and the pancreatic tail. The distal small bowel and colon were decompressed.

Graphic Jump Location
Place holder to copy figure label and caption
Figure 2.

Intraoperative view of the internal hernia orifice lateral to the duodenojejunal flexure after reduction of 90 cm of viable herniated jejunum.

Graphic Jump Location

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