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Image of the Month—Quiz Case FREE

Dinesh N. Ratnapala, MB, ChB; David Lisle, FRACR; Elizabeth Munn, FRCPA; Andreas L. Lambrianides, FRACS
[+] Author Affiliations

Author Affiliations:Departments of Surgery (Drs Ratnapala and Lambrianides) and Medical Imaging (Dr Lisle), Redcliffe Hospital, and Queensland Medical Laboratories, Kippa-Ring (Dr Munn), Redcliffe, Queensland, Australia.


Section Editor: E. Bredenberg Carl, MD


Arch Surg. 2009;144(11):1087. doi:10.1001/archsurg.2009.187-a.
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A 74-year-old man was admitted to the hospital with dehydration and a 6-week history of nausea, anorexia, watery diarrhea with associated crampy abdominal pain, and weight loss. Medical history included hypertension and paroxysmal atrial fibrillation with regular medication consisting of clopidogrel bisulfate and atenolol.

On examination, the patient was in sinus rhythm, was moderately dehydrated, had right-sided abdominal tenderness, and had no organomegaly or palpable masses. Digital rectal examination results were negative for blood. Laboratory tests showed moderate leukocytosis (white blood cell count, 15 600/μL [to convert to ×109per liter, multiply by 0.001]; with an elevated neutrophil count of 13 600/μL), an elevated C-reactive protein level (157 mg/L [to convert to nanomoles per liter, multiply by 9.524]), and an erythrocyte sedimentation rate of 32 mm/h. Arterial blood gas showed no lactic acidosis. Stool culture results were negative for pathogenic growth as well as for Clostridium difficiletoxin. The patient was admitted for resuscitation and investigation.

A computed tomographic scan (Figure 1) showed extensive concentric bowel wall thickening of the terminal ileum and cecum. There was also stranding in the mesenteric fat.

Place holder to copy figure label and caption
Figure 1.

Computed tomographic scan of the abdomen with oral contrast material showing concentric bowel wall thickening of the terminal ileum and cecum. There was also stranding in the mesenteric fat.

Graphic Jump Location

WHAT IS THE DIAGNOSIS?

A. Crohn disease

B. Nonocclusive ischemic colitis

C. Typhlitis

D. Lymphoma

Figures

Place holder to copy figure label and caption
Figure 1.

Computed tomographic scan of the abdomen with oral contrast material showing concentric bowel wall thickening of the terminal ileum and cecum. There was also stranding in the mesenteric fat.

Graphic Jump Location

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