Showing 1 – 20 of 1003
Relevance | Newest | Oldest |
  • Targeting Future Health Care Expenditure Reductions

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Surg. 2016; 151(8):725-725. doi: 10.1001/jamasurg.2015.5556
  • Cost Containment: Think Globally, Act Locally

    Abstract Full Text
    Arch Surg. 2010; 145(12):1136-1137. doi: 10.1001/archsurg.2010.257
  • Cost Containment: Think Globally, Act Locally

    Abstract Full Text
    Arch Surg. 2010; 145(12):1136-1137. doi: 10.1001/archsurg.2010.257
  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Guideline for the Prevention of Surgical Site Infection, 2017

    Abstract Full Text
    free access is active quiz
    JAMA Surg. 2017; 152(8):784-791. doi: 10.1001/jamasurg.2017.0904

    This guideline provides new and updated evidence-based recommendations for the prevention of surgical site infections.

  • JAMA Surgery March 1, 2017

    Figure: Surgical Supply Costs in the Intervention vs Control Groups

    A, Shown is the percentage change in the median surgical supply direct cost (in US dollars) during the study period (2015) in the intervention vs control groups. B, Shown is the difference between observed and expected total surgical supply spending between 2013 and 2015. Positive values indicate that the group was more costly than expected, and negative values indicate that the group was less costly than expected.
  • Behavioral Screening and Intervention for Improving Lower-Extremity Arthroplasty Outcomes and Controlling Costs

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Surg. 2016; 151(7):686-686. doi: 10.1001/jamasurg.2015.5528
  • Behavioral Screening and Intervention for Improving Lower-Extremity Arthroplasty Outcomes and Controlling Costs—Reply

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Surg. 2016; 151(7):686-687. doi: 10.1001/jamasurg.2015.5548
  • Association Between Surgeon Scorecard Use and Operating Room Costs

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Surg. 2017; 152(3):284-291. doi: 10.1001/jamasurg.2016.4674

    This case-control study examines the association between providing surgeons with individualized cost feedback and surgical supply costs in the operating room.

  • Comparing the Air Medical Prehospital Triage Score With Current Practice for Triage of Injured Patients to Helicopter Emergency Medical Services: A Cost-effectiveness Analysis

    Abstract Full Text
    online first
    JAMA Surg. 2017; doi: 10.1001/jamasurg.2017.4485

    This analysis evaluates the cost-effectiveness of current practice compared with the Air Medical Prehospital Triage score for helicopter emergency medical services scene triage of trauma patients.

  • The Surgeon Cost Report Card: A Novel Cost-Performance Feedback Tool

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Surg. 2016; 151(1):79-80. doi: 10.1001/jamasurg.2015.2666

    This article reviews a cost-performance feedback tool to provide surgeons with a continuous assessment of operating room expenditures to increase surgeons’ awareness of costs and encourage changes in behavior.

  • Costs and Consequences of Early Hospital Discharge After Major Inpatient Surgery in Older Adults

    Abstract Full Text
    online only
    JAMA Surg. 2017; 152(5):e170123. doi: 10.1001/jamasurg.2017.0123

    This cross-sectional cohort study evaluates the association between early postoperative discharge practices and overall surgical episode spending and expenditures for postdischarge care use and readmissions.

  • A Nationwide Analysis of Cost Variation for Autologous Free Flap Breast Reconstruction

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Surg. 2017; 152(11):1039-1047. doi: 10.1001/jamasurg.2017.2339

    This secondary cross-sectional analysis, performed using the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project National Inpatient Sample database from 2008 to 2010, investigates factors that influence cost variation for autologous free flap breast reconstruction.

  • Comparison of the Value of Nursing Work Environments in Hospitals Across Different Levels of Patient Risk

    Abstract Full Text
    free access
    JAMA Surg. 2016; 151(6):527-536. doi: 10.1001/jamasurg.2015.4908

    This matched-cohort study tests whether hospitals with better nursing work environments display better value than those with worse nursing environments and aims to determine patient risk groups associated with the greatest value.

  • Association of Hospital Market Concentration With Costs of Complex Hepatopancreaticobiliary Surgery

    Abstract Full Text
    online only
    JAMA Surg. 2017; 152(9):e172158. doi: 10.1001/jamasurg.2017.2158

    This study uses data from the US Nationwide Inpatient Sample to examine the association between regional hospital market concentration and hospital charges in a population of patients undergoing hepatopancreaticobiliary surgical procedures.

  • Use of an Operating Room Scorecard—Keeping Score and Cutting Costs

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Surg. 2017; 152(3):291-291. doi: 10.1001/jamasurg.2016.4693
  • Factors Associated With Interhospital Variability in Inpatient Costs of Liver and Pancreatic Resections

    Abstract Full Text
    free access
    JAMA Surg. 2016; 151(2):155-163. doi: 10.1001/jamasurg.2015.3618

    This study of patients undergoing hepatopancreaticobiliary surgery reports significant variability in hospital costs associated with patient and hospital characteristics.

  • Implementation of an Infection Prevention Bundle to Reduce Surgical Site Infections and Cost Following Spine Surgery

    Abstract Full Text
    free access
    JAMA Surg. 2016; 151(10):988-990. doi: 10.1001/jamasurg.2016.1794

    This study compares surgical site infections and costs of care for patients undergoing spinal surgery before and after implementation of an infection prevention bundle in the neurosurgical unit of the Cleveland Clinic.

  • Hospital and Payer Costs Associated With Surgical Complications

    Abstract Full Text
    free access
    JAMA Surg. 2016; 151(9):823-830. doi: 10.1001/jamasurg.2016.0773

    This observational study evaluates the costs associated with surgical quality and the relative financial burden on hospitals and payers.

  • Effect of Index Hospitalization Costs on Readmission Among Patients Undergoing Major Abdominal Surgery

    Abstract Full Text
    free access
    JAMA Surg. 2016; 151(8):718-724. doi: 10.1001/jamasurg.2015.5557

    This case series used a review of medical records to investigate the effect of costs of an index hospital admission on subsequent readmission rates among patients undergoing colorectal, pancreatic, or hepatic resection.

  • JAMA Surgery June 1, 2016

    Figure 1: Thirty-Day Mortality and 30-Day Cost by Patient Risk Level

    The x-axis represents the average risk of each individual matched pair; y-axis, the difference in outcome (focal-control) inside each matched pair. A point falling on the horizontal line at 0 represents no difference between outcomes of the 2 patients in the matched pair; a point falling below the line, a better outcome for the focal vs control patient. LOWESS confidence bands for the central tendency line were produced using the bootstrap method. The box plots describe the distribution of predicted risk from the fifth to the 95th percentiles. A, The mortality advantage from attending a focal hospital increases with escalating patient risk. OR indicates odds ratio. B, Only small and mostly insignificant cost differences are seen between focal and control hospitals. DIF indicates difference. C, The focal patients have lower costs when differences in the nurse-to-bed (NTB) ratio are not included in the costing formula. DIF indicates difference.