Showing 1 – 20 of 22
Relevance | Newest | Oldest |
  • The Effects of Gastric Surgery on Systemic Ghrelin Levels in the Morbidly Obese

    Abstract Full Text
    free access
    Arch Surg. 2004; 139(7):780-784. doi: 10.1001/archsurg.139.7.780
  • JAMA Surgery July 1, 2004

    Figure 4: The Effects of Gastric Surgery on Systemic Ghrelin Levels in the Morbidly Obese

    Preoperative and postoperative plasma ghrelin levels associated with each gastric fundus procedure. Gray bars indicate preoperative levels; black bars, postoperative values; double dagger, P<.001,difference between preoperative and postoperative levels following Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB); asterisk, P<.05, difference between lean antireflux surgery (ARS) patients and RYGB patients at baseline; dagger, P<.05, difference between lean ARS patients and RYGB patients after surgery; and VBG, vertical banded gastroplasty.
  • JAMA Surgery July 1, 2004

    Figure 5: The Effects of Gastric Surgery on Systemic Ghrelin Levels in the Morbidly Obese

    Circulating ghrelin levels in a gastric bypass operation (n = 9). Measurements were obtained at 4 time points: before surgery (Preop), after dividing the jejunum to form the Roux-en-Y limb (Jejunum), after dividing the stomach to create the small pouch (Stomach), and after surgery (Postop). Asterisk indicates P<.05; dagger, P<.01.
  • Roles for Ghrelin in the Regulation of Appetite and Body Weight

    Abstract Full Text
    free access
    Arch Surg. 2003; 138(4):389-396. doi: 10.1001/archsurg.138.4.389
  • JAMA Surgery April 1, 2003

    Figure 2: Roles for Ghrelin in the Regulation of Appetite and Body Weight

    Mean (SE) 24-hour plasma ghrelin profiles from 13 obese human subjects before and after dietary weight loss. Subjects lost weight by consuming a 1000-kcal/d liquid formula diet for 3 months, followed by 3 additional months of stabilization on a solid diet at the new, reduced weight. Average final weight loss was 17.4% (1.5%). Ghrelin profiles were obtained at the beginning and end of the 6-month protocol. Breakfast (B), lunch (L), and dinner (D) were provided at the times indicated. To convert ghrelin values to picomoles per liter, multiply by 0.296. Reprinted with permission from Cummings et al.
  • JAMA Surgery April 1, 2003

    Figure 4: Roles for Ghrelin in the Regulation of Appetite and Body Weight

    Mean (SE) 24-hour plasma ghrelin profiles from subjects who underwent gastric bypass and nonoperated on controls. Study groups include obese subjects who had undergone a proximal Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (n = 5), normal-weight controls (n = 10), and obese subjects matched to the gastric bypass group with regard to final body mass index (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared), age, and sex (n = 5). Breakfast (B), lunch (L), and dinner (D) were provided at the times indicated. To convert ghrelin values to picomoles per liter, multiply by 0.296. Reprinted with permission from Cummings et al.
  • JAMA Surgery July 1, 2004

    Figure 1: The Effects of Gastric Surgery on Systemic Ghrelin Levels in the Morbidly Obese

    The 3 major steps of a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass operation with a resultant 15-mL vertical pouch: (1) dividing the jejunum and forming an enteroenterostomy to create a long (100-150 cm) Roux-en-Y limb; (2) completely dividing the stomach to create a vertical pouch that is 5 cm long and 1 to 1½ cm wide; and (3) connecting the Roux-en-Y limb to the vertical pouch.
  • JAMA Surgery July 1, 2004

    Figure 2: The Effects of Gastric Surgery on Systemic Ghrelin Levels in the Morbidly Obese

    The vertical banded gastroplasty only partially divides the stomach, with a restrictive pouch of similar dimensions as the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. The outflow of the pouch is reinforced by a prosthetic band.
  • JAMA Surgery July 1, 2004

    Figure 3: The Effects of Gastric Surgery on Systemic Ghrelin Levels in the Morbidly Obese

    The antireflux surgery or Nissen fundoplication performed for gastroesophageal reflux disease. The greater curvature is fully mobilized, and the fundus is wrapped around the esophagus to create an antireflux valve.
  • JAMA Surgery July 1, 2004

    Table: The Effects of Gastric Surgery on Systemic Ghrelin Levels in the Morbidly Obese

    Age and Body Mass Index (BMI) for Patients Undergoing Various Gastric Fundus Procedures
  • JAMA Surgery April 1, 2003

    Figure 1: Roles for Ghrelin in the Regulation of Appetite and Body Weight

    Model to explain compensatory adjustments of caloric intake and expenditure in response to changes in body fat content. Leptin and insulin are peripheral adiposity signals that circulate in proportion to the amount of body fat and act in the hypothalamus to stimulate catabolic effector pathways while inhibiting anabolic pathways. These pathways exert opposing effects on energy balance (the difference between calories consumed and expended), which, in turn, determines the amount of body fat. CNS indicates central nervous system. Reprinted with permission from Nature (Schwartz et al), 2000, Macmillan Publishers Ltd.
  • JAMA Surgery April 1, 2003

    Figure 3: Roles for Ghrelin in the Regulation of Appetite and Body Weight

    Diagrams of a proximal Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (A), vertical banded gastroplasty (B), and jejunoileal bypass (C). Reprinted with permission from the American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Available at: http://www.asbs.org.
  • Soluble CD40 Ligand in Morbidly Obese Patients: Effect of Body Mass Index on Recovery to Normal Levels After Gastric Bypass Surgery

    Abstract Full Text
    free access
    JAMA Surg. 2013; 148(2):151-156. doi: 10.1001/jamasurgery.2013.419
    Baena-Fustegueras and colleagues studied soluble CD40 ligand (sCD40L) and other factors implicated in coagulation (plasminogen activator inhibitor 1, antithrombin III, and fibrinogen) and inflammation (C-reactive protein) in 34 patients with morbid obesity and different body mass indexes, before and after weight loss induced by bariatric surgery.
  • Obesity, Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, and Other Comorbidities: A Prospective Cohort Study of Laparoscopic Sleeve Gastrectomy vs Medical Treatment

    Abstract Full Text
    free access
    Arch Surg. 2012; 147(8):694-700. doi: 10.1001/archsurg.2012.222
    In a prospective cohort study involving 60 morbidly obese patients with type 2 diabetes, Leonetti and coauthors compare the effect of sleeve gastrectomy vs medical therapy on type 2 diabetes mellitus and other obesity-related comorbidities. An invited critique suggests that obese diabetic patients should have access to bariatric surgery in appropriate clinical circumstances.
  • Bariatric Surgery as a Novel Treatment for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Systematic Review

    Abstract Full Text
    free access
    Arch Surg. 2011; 146(6):744-750. doi: 10.1001/archsurg.2011.134
  • Gastric Bypass vs Sleeve Gastrectomy for Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Abstract Full Text
    free access
    Arch Surg. 2011; 146(2):143-148. doi: 10.1001/archsurg.2010.326
  • Revisional Bariatric Surgery: 13-Year Experience From a Tertiary Institution

    Abstract Full Text
    free access
    Arch Surg. 2010; 145(2):173-177. doi: 10.1001/archsurg.2009.260
  • Obesity

    Abstract Full Text
    Arch Surg. 2004; 139(4):406-414. doi: 10.1001/archsurg.139.4.406
  • The Best of the Best—2002

    Abstract Full Text
    free access
    Arch Surg. 2003; 138(11):1264-1266. doi: 10.1001/archsurg.138.11.1264
  • Obesity in America

    Abstract Full Text
    free access
    Arch Surg. 2003; 138(4):354-355. doi: 10.1001/archsurg.138.4.354