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  • JAMA Surgery March 1, 2017

    Figure 1: An Unusual Cause of Small-Bowel Obstruction

    Computed tomographic scan showing an intraluminal hypodense mass (pink arrowhead) causing a small-bowel obstruction. Adjacent to this area, the endoscopic capsule (asterisk) is demonstrated in a proximal dilated loop of the small bowel.
  • An Unusual Cause of Small-Bowel Obstruction

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Surg. 2017; 152(3):301-302. doi: 10.1001/jamasurg.2016.4959

    A 43-year-old man presented to the emergency department with sudden onset of cramps and abdominal pain after capsule endoscopy, which was ingested 3 days prior to his emergency department admission. An intraluminal hypodense mass was found in the mid-jejunum, and the capsule was clearly demonstrated to be adjacent in a dilated proximal loop of the small bowel. What is your diagnosis?

  • JAMA Surgery March 1, 2017

    Figure 2: Still Another Case of Right Lower Quadrant Abdominal Pain

    Computed tomographic scan revealing diverticular outpouching on the posterior-lateral cecal wall with calcifications, pericolonic fat infiltration, and thickening of the adjacent fascia (a); thickening of the cecal wall, with a small fluid collection 21 mm in diameter (b); and intestinum tenue (c).
  • JAMA Surgery September 1, 2016

    Figure 2: Progressive Abdominal Pain Following Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy

    Surgical specimen showing a fistulous tract with surrounding inflammatory changes in the small bowel (arrowhead).
  • JAMA Surgery August 1, 2016

    Figure 1: An Older Female Patient With Abdominal Distention

    A, Computed tomographic scan showing small-bowel ileus. B, Computed tomographic scan showing a mass lesion in the right lower pelvic wall.
  • Endoluminal Vacuum Therapy for Esophageal and Upper Intestinal Anastomotic Leaks

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Surg. 2016; 151(6):573-574. doi: 10.1001/jamasurg.2016.0255

    This Surgical Innovation discusses the use of endoluminal vacuum therapy for esophageal, gastric, and small intestine leaks or perforations.

  • JAMA Surgery July 1, 2015

    Figure 2: Correlation Between Computed Tomographic Angiography (CTA), Nuclear Scintigraphy (NBS), and Visceral Angiography (VA)

    Correlation of anatomical localization of hemorrhage between CTA and VA (A) and between NBS and VA (B). The size of the black circles corresponds to the number of cases in each sample. The dashed lines separate small-bowel bleeding data points from colonic bleeding data points. LLQ indicates left lower quadrant; LUQ, left upper quadrant; RLQ, right lower quadrant; and RUQ, right upper quadrant.
  • JAMA Surgery March 1, 2015

    Figure 2: Neonatal Bowel Obstruction With Unilateral Labial Swelling

    Distended small-bowel loops (superiorly) with 6 × 6–cm, torsed, gangrenous, chocolate-colored, right-sided ovarian cyst (inferiorly).
  • JAMA Surgery March 1, 2015

    Figure 1: Neonatal Bowel Obstruction With Unilateral Labial Swelling

    A, Abdominal radiograph showing distended small-bowel loops with absent gas in the colon and rectum. B, Delayed radiography of the upper gastrointestinal tract with water-soluble contrast demonstrating retained contrast in the terminal ileum 6 days after initial radiography.
  • JAMA Surgery November 1, 2014

    Figure 1: The Cocoon Abdomen

    Cross-sectional computed tomographic scan of the abdomen. Dilated small intestine with air-fluid levels extending to the terminal ileum (A and B). C, Intraoperative image of involved small intestine. Tightly coiled and twisted small bowel with adhesive bands.
  • JAMA Surgery November 1, 2014

    Figure 2: The Cocoon Abdomen

    Histologic image of small-bowel serosal layer (high power). Markedly thickened serosa with dense paucicellular fibrous tissue (hematoxylin-eosin; A, original magnification ×40; B, original magnification ×100).
  • JAMA Surgery September 1, 2014

    Figure 2: Abrupt Vomiting and Pain With Abdominal Mass

    A, Typical corkscrew vessels and both tapering and obstruction of the superior mesenteric artery are shown by use of a 3-dimensional reconstruction of a computed tomographic angiographic scan. B, Encircled loops of the small-bowel volvulus around the superior mesenteric artery.
  • Neonates With Short Bowel Syndrome: An Optimistic Future for Parenteral Nutrition Independence

    Abstract Full Text
    free access
    JAMA Surg. 2014; 149(7):663-670. doi: 10.1001/jamasurg.2013.4332

    Fallon et al determine the probability of wean from parenteral nutrition (PN) in neonates with short bowel syndrome (SBS) based on small intestinal length amidst the new era of hepatoprotective strategies and multidisciplinary management.

  • JAMA Surgery July 1, 2014

    Figure 2: Predicted Probability of Weaning From Parenteral Nutrition (PN)

    A, Predicted probability based on small intestinal length. B, Predicted probability based on percentage of predicted small intestinal length. C, Predicted probability based on small intestinal length excluding patients who underwent bowel-lengthening procedures. The curved black line indicates predicted probability. Patients who died (n = 8) or underwent transplant (n = 4) were excluded.
  • JAMA Surgery July 1, 2014

    Figure 3: Cumulative Probability of Weaning From Parenteral Nutrition (PN) Over Time

    A, Cumulative probability of wean based on small intestinal length. B, Cumulative probability of wean based on percentage of predicted length. Patients who died (n = 8) or underwent transplant (n = 4) were excluded. IQR indicates interquartile range.
  • The Correlation Between the Expression of Differentiation Markers in Rat Small Intestinal Mucosa and the Transcript Levels of Schlafen 3

    Abstract Full Text
    free access
    JAMA Surg. 2013; 148(11):1013-1019. doi: 10.1001/jamasurg.2013.3572

    In a randomized controlled experiment, Kovalenko and Basson determine whether schlafen 3 (but not other schlafen proteins) act in vivo and whether its effects are limited to the small intestine.

  • JAMA Surgery July 1, 2013

    Figure: Superselective Mesenteric Angiography, Which Localizes a Vascular Abnormality in the Small Bowel

    A patient with an actively bleeding arteriovenous malformation in the jejunum, despite attempted embolization, underwent SSMA and catheter localization prior to exploration in the operating room. Visceral angiography was performed via a right femoral artery puncture using a 7F sheath and catheter and a 3F coaxial catheter. A contrast agent (Ultravist 300; Bayer) was injected into the inferior mesenteric artery, the superior mesenteric artery, and the fifth and sixth jejunal arteries to delineate the pathology. The patient was found to have arteriosclerotic vessels and no signs of active extravasation. The site of previous embolization in the territory of the sixth jejunal artery can be seen (black arrow), as well as a small vessel bypassing the embolized segment (white arrow) to supply an abnormal-looking area of jejunum containing prominent vascular spaces and early venous drainage. These appearances were consistent with revascularization of the previously embolized arteriovenous malformation. The abnormality was situated at the junction of the territory supplied by the fifth and sixth jejunal arteries. The coaxial catheter was left in the sixth jejunal artery (gray arrow), and the patient was transferred to the operating room for laparotomy and resection following methylene blue injection.
  • JAMA Surgery June 1, 2013

    Figure: Image of the Month—Diagnosis

    Figure 2. Eleven small-bowel diverticula found in proximal small bowel, one of which was firm and grossly perforated (A). White arrow shows perforated diverticulum, whereas black arrows denote nonperforated diverticula in same small-bowel segment. Pathologic examination revealed calcified fecalith in perforated diverticulum (B).
  • Image of the Month—Diagnosis

    Abstract Full Text
    free access
    JAMA Surg. 2013; 148(6):578-578. doi: 10.1001/jamasurg.2013.303b
  • Image of the Month—Quiz Case

    Abstract Full Text
    free access
    JAMA Surg. 2013; 148(6):577-577. doi: 10.1001/jamasurg.2013.303a