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  • JAMA Surgery July 1, 2014

    Figure: Pelvic Mass After Prostatectomy

    Magnetic resonance imaging of the pelvis reveals a large heterogeneously enhancing mass within the prostatic bed. Axial (A and B) and sagittal (C and D) views reveal that the mass has T1 isointensity to hypointensity and T2 hyperintensity, suggesting internal areas of necrosis. A marked mass effect is seen on the anterior-inferior bladder, which displaces the bladder superiorly. The mass is contiguous with the right anterior aspect of the obturator internus and with the inner cortex of the midline superior pubic rami, which demonstrate erosion of the midline but no appreciable enhancing marrow signal.
  • JAMA Surgery April 1, 2014

    Figure 3: An Uncommon Surgical Disease

    Pelvic magnetic resonance image showing the hedrocele (H) containing intestinal loops protruding into the rectum (R). B indicates bladder; P, pubis; U, uterus; and V, vagina.
  • JAMA Surgery October 1, 2012

    Figure: “Intertransversalis” Approach for Laparoscopic Urology: Surgical Anatomy Concerns—Reply

    Figure. Intertransversalis fascia approach during retroperitoneal laparoscopic right nephrectomy. A, Working space filled with blood and fiber after balloon dilation in the fascial space between the rectus abdominis muscle and the superficial layers of transversalis fascia (TF). B, Observing the yellow fat between the 2 layers of the TF in the retroperitoneal region. C, Clearing the fat between the 2 layers of the TF. D, Cutting open the deep layer of the TF and perirenal fascia. 1 Indicates the rectus abdominis muscle; 2, torn fiber of the superficial layer of the TF; 3, superficial layer of the TF (covering the interior surface of pubis); 4, Retzius space; 5, superficial layer of the TF (covering the interior surface of the transversus abdominis); 6, fat between the 2 layers of the TF; 7, deep layer of the TF (superficially covering the perirenal fascia); 8, perirenal fascia; and 9, perinephric fat.
  • JAMA Surgery February 1, 2012

    Figure: Intertransversalis Fascia Approach in Urologic Laparoscopic Operations

    Figure 4. Intertransversalis fascia approach during transperitoneal laparoscopic partial cystectomy. A, After establishment of pneumoperitoneum, we can see the posterior aspect of the median umbilical ligament and the bladder. B, The peritoneum and urachus are incised, and the transversalis fascia (TF) is exposed. C, The TF is incised, and the rectus abdominis is exposed. D, The 2 layers of the TF are identified. E, The space between the 2 layers of the TF was bluntly separated. F, We can reach the Retzius space between the 2 layers of the TF. 1 indicates peritoneum (covering the interior surface of the median umbilical ligament); 2, peritoneum (covering the interior surface of the bladder); 3, peritoneum; 4, fat between the peritoneum and the deep layer of the TF; 5, deep layer of the TF; 6, superficial layer of the TF; 7, white reticular fibers between the 2 layers of the TF; 8, fat between the 2 layers of the TF; 9, rectus abdominis muscle; 10, white reticular fibers between the rectus abdominis muscle and the superficial layer of the TF; and 11, pubis.
  • JAMA Surgery February 1, 2012

    Figure: Intertransversalis Fascia Approach in Urologic Laparoscopic Operations

    Figure 5. Clinical anatomy of the transversalis fascia (TF). A, Cross plane below the 12th rib. B, Cross plane of the anterior superior iliac spine. C, Cross plane above the deep ring. D, Cross plane of the superior border of the pubic symphysis. E, Sagittal plane from the linea alba. 1 indicates peritoneum (blue); 2, fascial space between the deep layer of the TF and the peritoneum; 3, deep layer of the TF (red); 4, fascial space between the 2 layers of the TF; 5, superficial layer of the TF (green); 6, fascial space between the superficial layer of the TF and the transversus abdominis; 7, transversus abdominis; 8, obliquus internus abdominis muscle; 9, obliquus externus abdominis muscle; 10, linea alba; 11, inferior epigastric artery; 12, posterior rectus sheath; 13, rectus abdominis muscle; 14, anterior rectus sheath; 15, abdominal cavity; 16, colon; 17, Gerota (perirenal) fascia; 18, perinephric fat; 19, left kidney; 20, fascia lumbodorsalis; 21, latissimus dorsi muscle; 22, quadratus lumborum muscle; 23, psoas major muscle; 24, iliacus; 25, left common iliac artery; 26, left external iliac vein; 27, left gonadal artery; 28, iliopsoas muscle; 29, sartorius muscle; 30, rectum; 31, obturator internus muscle; 32, levator ani muscle; 33, coccyx; 34, right seminal vesicle; 35, prostate; 36, bladder; 37, obturator vein; 38, pubis; 39, obturator externus muscle; 40, median umbilical ligament; 41, medial umbilical ligament; 42, umbilicus; 43, Retzius space; 44, Bogros space; 45, retroperitoneal fat; 46, vas deferens; 47, superficial branch of the deep dorsal vein of the penis; and 48, pubic symphysis.
  • JAMA Surgery February 1, 2012

    Figure: Intertransversalis Fascia Approach in Urologic Laparoscopic Operations

    Figure 3. Intertransversalis fascia approach during extraperitoneal laparoscopic radical prostatectomy. A, The space between the 2 layers of the transversalis fascia (TF) in the region of the anterior inferior abdominal wall. B, The space between the 2 layers of the TF in the left anterior inferior abdominal wall. C, The inferior epigastric vessel runs between the 2 layers of the TF. D, The space between the 2 layers of the TF in the left inguinal region. E, Cutting off the superficial branch of the deep dorsal vein of the penis embedded in the fat in the Retzius space. F, Cutting off the superficial branch of the deep dorsal vein of the penis and cleaning up the fat in the Retzius space, then we can then see the deep layer of the TF superficially covering the prostate. 1 Indicates the superficial layer of the TF (covering the interior surface of the rectus abdominis muscle); 2, superficial layer of the TF (covering the interior surface of the transversus abdominis); 3, superficial layer of the TF (covering the interior surface of the pubis); 4, deep layer of the TF (superficially covering the peritoneum); 5, deep layer of the TF (superficially covering the left external iliac vessel); 6, deep layer of the TF (superficially covering the bladder); 7, deep layer of the TF (superficially covering the prostate); 8, white reticular fibers between the 2 layers of the TF; 9, fat between the 2 layers of the TF; 10, left inferior epigastric vessel (running through the space between the 2 layers); 11, left pubic vein; 12, superficial branch of the deep dorsal vein of the penis; 13, Retzius space; and 14, Bogros space.
  • JAMA Surgery January 1, 2005

    Figure 1: The History of Anatomy and Surgery of the Preperitoneal Space

    Representation of the layers of the lower abdominal wall and the inguinal area. 1 indicates the external oblique fascia (fascia of Galaudet); 2, external oblique aponeurosis; 3, internal oblique muscle; 4, transversus abdominis muscle; 5, transversalis fascia anterior; 6, external spermatic fascia; 7, Cooper ligament; 8, pubic bone; 9, pectineus muscle; 10, transversalis fascia; 11, transversalis fascia posterior lamina; 12, vessels; 13, peritoneum; 14, space of Bogros; 15, preperitoneal fat; 16, transversus abdominis aponeurosis and anterior lamina of transversalis fascia; 17, femoral artery; and 18, femoral vein. Reprinted with permission from Skandalakis et al.
  • December 2002

    Abstract Full Text
    Arch Surg. 2002; 137(12):1376-1376. doi: 10.1001/archsurg.137.12.1376
  • Fixed-Distance Model for Balloon Placement During Fluoroscopy-Free Resuscitative Endovascular Balloon Occlusion of the Aorta in a Civilian Population

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Surg. 2017; 152(4):351-358. doi: 10.1001/jamasurg.2016.4757

    This study describes a method for performing resuscitative endovascular balloon occlusion of the aorta (REBOA) using a standardized distance from a set point of entry.

  • Division of the Pubis for Massive Hemorrhage from Fractures of the Pelvis

    Abstract Full Text
    AMA Arch Surg. 1959; 78(4):535-537. doi: 10.1001/archsurg.1959.04320040031009
  • TREATMENT OF OSTEITIS PUBIS WITH CORTICOTROPIN AND CORTISONE: Report of Two Cases

    Abstract Full Text
    AMA Arch Surg. 1954; 69(4):543-548. doi: 10.1001/archsurg.1954.01270040099016
  • OSTEOMYELITIS PUBIS DUE TO PSEUDOMONAS AERUGINOSA TREATED WITH POLYMYXIN B SULFATE

    Abstract Full Text
    AMA Arch Surg. 1953; 67(6):937-938. doi: 10.1001/archsurg.1953.01260040950017
  • CHANGES IN THE SYMPHYSIS PUBIS AND SACRO-ILIAC ARTICULATIONS AS A RESULT OF PREGNANCY AND CHILDBIRTH

    Abstract Full Text
    Arch Surg. 1932; 25(5):870-879. doi: 10.1001/archsurg.1932.01160230053004
  • Transversus Abdominis Release as an Alternative Component Separation Technique for Ventral Hernia Repair

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Surg. 2016; 151(4):383-384. doi: 10.1001/jamasurg.2015.3611

    This review describes the innovative use of transversus abdominis release as an alternative component separation technique for ventral hernia repair and addresses limitations of traditional reconstructive options.

  • THE PUBIC BONES AND THEIR SYMPHYSIS

    Abstract Full Text
    Arch Surg. 1936; 32(5):823-841. doi: 10.1001/archsurg.1936.01180230078006
  • An Uncommon Surgical Disease

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Surg. 2014; 149(4):395-396. doi: 10.1001/jamasurg.2013.808
  • Increased Tumor Establishment and Growth After Laparotomy vs Laparoscopy in a Murine Model

    Abstract Full Text
    Arch Surg. 1995; 130(6):649-653. doi: 10.1001/archsurg.1995.01430060087016
  • JAMA Surgery October 1, 2012

    Figure: The U and the Sushi Roll: A Conceptual Aid for Lichtenstein Hernia Repair

    Figure 1. The U. A, The inferior arm is the shelving edge of the inguinal ligament (solid arrow); the superior arm is the conjoint tendon (dashed arrow); and the pubic tubercle (black dot) is the apex. B, Completed dissection of the U. The Penrose drain encircles the hernia and cord structures (asterisk).
  • JAMA Surgery October 1, 2012

    Figure: The U and the Sushi Roll: A Conceptual Aid for Lichtenstein Hernia Repair

    Figure 3. The completed hernia dissection with application of the mesh. The U (solid line) outlines the points of mesh fixation, secured with interrupted sutures starting at the pubic tubercle (asterisks). An inferior cut in the mesh (dotted line) creates a new internal ring (circle) for the cord structures, which have been retracted superiorly.
  • “Intertransversalis” Approach for Laparoscopic Urology: Surgical Anatomy Concerns—Reply

    Abstract Full Text
    Arch Surg. 2012; 147(10):980-982. doi: 10.1001/archsurg.2012.2221