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  • JAMA Surgery October 1, 2016

    Figure 2: Chest Discomfort and Longstanding Dyspnea on Exertion

    Laparoscopy of left diaphragm defect after reduction of bowel, with stomach and spleen not yet fully reduced.
  • JAMA Surgery July 1, 2016

    Figure 1: Calcified Cyst in the Spleen

    A, Computed tomography (CT) revealed a large, well-defined, cystic mass with mural calcification in the spleen. B, The surface of the cyst was extremely dense and appeared to have an eggshell-like calcification; the cyst was filled with about 300 mL of yellowish opalescent fluid containing numerous cholesterol-like crystals (arrowhead).
  • Calcified Cyst in the Spleen

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Surg. 2016; 151(7):675-676. doi: 10.1001/jamasurg.2016.0060

    A man in his mid-50s was referred to our hospital because he had a cystic mass in his spleen that was discovered incidentally during a routine physical examination. He had no history of abdominal trauma, infection, or surgery. What is your diagnosis?

  • JAMA Surgery April 1, 2015

    Figure 4: Spleen Transection Model

    A, Top left, The spleen and vessels are exposed. Right, The spleen is transected transversely between the entrances of the splenic vessels. Bottom left, The arrowheads and asterisk represent the 3 transected sections of spleen. B, Blood loss by time. Total blood loss was 27.9% of total blood volume (TBV). C, Heart rate over time. D, Change of mean arterial pressure (ΔMAP) from baseline. Arrowheads represent time of injury. Data points represent means; whiskers, SE.
  • Development and Validation of 4 Different Rat Models of Uncontrolled Hemorrhage

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    JAMA Surg. 2015; 150(4):316-324. doi: 10.1001/jamasurg.2014.1685

    This experimental rat model study of hemorrhage provides a foundation to design novel nonsurgical therapies to control hemorrhage and allows flexibility in experimental design.

  • JAMA Surgery April 1, 2015

    Figure 2: Splenic Cyst

    Spleen in situ after mobilization and lysis of adhesion. The white area over the anterior aspect of the spleen is the capsule of the larger cyst. The posterior cyst was identified after the vessels were divided. The spleen and cysts were removed en bloc without violating their capsule.
  • JAMA Surgery April 1, 2015

    Figure 1: Splenic Cyst

    A large splenic cyst with calcified capsule is present in the anterior aspect of the spleen, with a smaller cyst in the posterior aspect of the spleen, also with calcified capsule. Arrowheads indicate the location of the cysts. Under higher resolution, debris is noted within the larger cyst.
  • JAMA Surgery April 1, 2015

    Figure 5: A Summary of Hemorrhagic Shock Class by Model

    A, Taking into account the percentage of loss of total blood volume (TBV) and the hemodynamic profile, the tail-cut and liver punch biopsy models correlate best with class I hemorrhagic shock, whereas the liver laceration and spleen transection models correlate best with class II hemorrhagic shock. B, Loss of TBV by model. C, Heart rate by model. D, Mean arterial pressure (MAP) by model.aP < .001 vs tail-cut and liver punch biopsy models and P = .003 vs liver laceration model.
  • JAMA Surgery August 1, 2014

    Figure 2: Young Woman With Massive Splenomegaly

    A, Gross appearance of the spleen immediately after splenectomy. B, Pathologic sectioning of the spleen demonstrating multiple cysts.
  • JAMA Surgery October 1, 2013

    Figure 2: Rare Complication After Viral Illness

    Results of pathological review of the spleen specimen. A, The resected spleen specimen with a large area of disruption of the splenic capsule measuring 16 cm × 15 cm × 14 cm and weighing 574 g. B, Immunoperoxidase staining for CD20 reveals immunoblastic proliferation of B cells with apoptotic debris and few normal follicles in the presence of global architectural disruption (original magnification ×10). C, Epstein-Barr virus in situ hybridization with RNA probe confirms infectious etiology of the splenic rupture (original magnification ×10).
  • Laparoscopic Spleen-Preserving Distal Pancreatectomy: Splenic Vessel Preservation Compared With the Warshaw Technique

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    JAMA Surg. 2013; 148(3):246-252. doi: 10.1001/jamasurg.2013.768
    Adam and colleagues compare preservation with the division of the splenic vessels in the surgical management of laparoscopic spleen-preserving distal pancreatectomy. They studied 55 patients who underwent splenic vessel preservation and 85 patients who underwent the Warshaw technique.
  • Image of the Month—Quiz Case

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    JAMA Surg. 2013; 148(2):205-205. doi: 10.1001/jamasurgery.2013.418a
  • JAMA Surgery November 1, 2012

    Figure: Image of the Month—Diagnosis

    Figure 2. Tumor excised en bloc with the stomach (arrow), the transverse colon (arrowhead), the body and tail of the pancreas (not recognizable), and the spleen (asterisk).
  • Image of the Month—Quiz Case

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    Arch Surg. 2012; 147(6):573-573. doi: 10.1001/archsurg.2011.843
  • Splenic Vein–Inferior Mesenteric Vein Anastomosis to Lessen Left-Sided Portal Hypertension After Pancreaticoduodenectomy With Concomitant Vascular Resection

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    Arch Surg. 2011; 146(12):1375-1381. doi: 10.1001/archsurg.2011.688
  • Image of the Month—Quiz Case

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    Arch Surg. 2011; 146(10):1211-1211. doi: 10.1001/archsurg.2011.262-a
  • Image of the Month—Quiz Case

    Abstract Full Text
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    Arch Surg. 2011; 146(9):1099-1099. doi: 10.1001/archsurg.2011.224-a
  • Laparoscopic Treatment of Splenomegaly: A Case for Hand-Assisted Laparoscopic Surgery

    Abstract Full Text
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    Arch Surg. 2011; 146(7):818-823. doi: 10.1001/archsurg.2011.149
  • JAMA Surgery July 1, 2011

    Figure: Image of the Month—Diagnosis

    Figure 2. Intraoperative photograph showing ruptured splenic hematoma.
  • Image of the Month—Diagnosis

    Abstract Full Text
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    Arch Surg. 2011; 146(7):881-882. doi: 10.1001/archsurg.2011.162-b