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  • Laparoscopic Umbilical and Epigastric Hernia Repair: The Procedure of Choice?

    Abstract Full Text
    JAMA Surg. 2013; 148(11):1049-1049. doi: 10.1001/jamasurg.2013.3607
  • JAMA Surgery February 1, 2012

    Figure: Intertransversalis Fascia Approach in Urologic Laparoscopic Operations

    Figure 1. Balloon dilation in the intertransversalis fascia space. A, The balloon dissector is inserted into the intertransversalis fascia space from the incision below the 12th rib in the posterior axillary line. B, The balloon dissector is inserted into the intertransversalis fascia space from the incision at the base of the umbilicus. C, The 2 layers of the transversalis fascia (TF) are separated in the peritoneum. 1 indicates peritoneum (blue); 2, fascial space between the deep layer of the TF and the peritoneum; 3, deep layer of the TF (red); 4, fascial space between the 2 layers of the TF; 5, superficial layer of the TF (green); 6, fascial space between the superficial layer of the TF and the transversus abdominis; 7, transversus abdominis; 8, linea alba; and 9, balloon dissector.
  • JAMA Surgery February 1, 2012

    Figure: Intertransversalis Fascia Approach in Urologic Laparoscopic Operations

    Figure 5. Clinical anatomy of the transversalis fascia (TF). A, Cross plane below the 12th rib. B, Cross plane of the anterior superior iliac spine. C, Cross plane above the deep ring. D, Cross plane of the superior border of the pubic symphysis. E, Sagittal plane from the linea alba. 1 indicates peritoneum (blue); 2, fascial space between the deep layer of the TF and the peritoneum; 3, deep layer of the TF (red); 4, fascial space between the 2 layers of the TF; 5, superficial layer of the TF (green); 6, fascial space between the superficial layer of the TF and the transversus abdominis; 7, transversus abdominis; 8, obliquus internus abdominis muscle; 9, obliquus externus abdominis muscle; 10, linea alba; 11, inferior epigastric artery; 12, posterior rectus sheath; 13, rectus abdominis muscle; 14, anterior rectus sheath; 15, abdominal cavity; 16, colon; 17, Gerota (perirenal) fascia; 18, perinephric fat; 19, left kidney; 20, fascia lumbodorsalis; 21, latissimus dorsi muscle; 22, quadratus lumborum muscle; 23, psoas major muscle; 24, iliacus; 25, left common iliac artery; 26, left external iliac vein; 27, left gonadal artery; 28, iliopsoas muscle; 29, sartorius muscle; 30, rectum; 31, obturator internus muscle; 32, levator ani muscle; 33, coccyx; 34, right seminal vesicle; 35, prostate; 36, bladder; 37, obturator vein; 38, pubis; 39, obturator externus muscle; 40, median umbilical ligament; 41, medial umbilical ligament; 42, umbilicus; 43, Retzius space; 44, Bogros space; 45, retroperitoneal fat; 46, vas deferens; 47, superficial branch of the deep dorsal vein of the penis; and 48, pubic symphysis.
  • JAMA Surgery March 1, 2011

    Figure 1: Image of the Month—Quiz Case

    A red and blue, multinodular tumor of the umbilicus.
  • Image of the Month—Quiz Case

    Abstract Full Text
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    Arch Surg. 2011; 146(3):361-361. doi: 10.1001/archsurg.2011.24-a
  • Image of the Month—Diagnosis

    Abstract Full Text
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    Arch Surg. 2011; 146(3):362-362. doi: 10.1001/archsurg.2011.24-b
  • JAMA Surgery February 1, 2011

    Figure 4: Single-Incision Laparoscopic Surgery for Right Hemicolectomy

    Closure of the umbilical incision.
  • JAMA Surgery February 1, 2011

    Figure 2: Single-Incision Laparoscopic Surgery for Right Hemicolectomy

    A, A single-incision laparoscopic surgery port is inserted through the umbilical incision. B, Three 5-mm trocars can be inserted through the port to accommodate the laparoscopic instruments and camera (C).
  • JAMA Surgery November 15, 2010

    Figure 2: Simple Measurement of Intra-abdominal Fat for Abdominal Surgery Outcome Prediction

    Measurement of outer abdominal fat (OAF). Computed tomography scans were assessed at the level of the umbilicus (short arrow). The thickest anterior abdominal wall distance was measured as the OAF (long arrow).
  • Image of the Month—Quiz Case

    Abstract Full Text
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    Arch Surg. 2010; 145(9):911-911. doi: 10.1001/archsurg.2010.168-a
  • JAMA Surgery March 1, 2010

    Figure: Modified Makuuchi Incision for Foregut Procedures

    Figure 1. The modified Makuuchi incision. A, The modified incision is used for liver and right-sided abdominal surgery. This incision begins cephalad to the xiphoid, extends to 1 cm above the umbilicus, and then extends laterally to the right. B, The L incision is used for gastric, pancreatic, and left-sided abdominal surgery. This incision is a mirror image of the modified Makuuchi incision.
  • Modified Makuuchi Incision for Foregut Procedures

    Abstract Full Text
    Arch Surg. 2010; 145(3):281-284. doi: 10.1001/archsurg.2010.7
  • JAMA Surgery October 1, 2009

    Figure 1: Transumbilical Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy: A Novel Technique

    Standard 5-mm port and low-profile 5-mm port in the umbilicus.
  • Image of the Month—Quiz Case

    Abstract Full Text
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    Arch Surg. 2006; 141(9):943-943. doi: 10.1001/archsurg.141.9.943-a
  • JAMA Surgery July 1, 2006

    Figure 1: Image of the Month—Quiz Case

    A well-circumscribed 5 × 5-cm solid mass just below the umbilicus on an abdominopelvic computed tomographic scan.
  • Image of the Month—Quiz Case

    Abstract Full Text
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    Arch Surg. 2006; 141(7):709-710. doi: 10.1001/archsurg.141.7.709
  • Image of the Month—Quiz Case

    Abstract Full Text
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    Arch Surg. 2005; 140(12):1223-1223. doi: 10.1001/archsurg.140.12.1223
  • JAMA Surgery September 1, 2003

    Figure 6: Triple-Stapling Technique for Jejunojejunostomy in Laparoscopic Gastric Bypass

    Another laparoscopic linear cutter (from the umbilical port) is used to close the common enterotomy.
  • JAMA Surgery September 1, 2003

    Figure 3: Triple-Stapling Technique for Jejunojejunostomy in Laparoscopic Gastric Bypass

    A laparoscopic linear cutter (from the umbilical port) is placed into the antimesenteric side of the 2 limbs.
  • JAMA Surgery November 1, 2002

    Figure 8: Claude Couinaud: A Passion for the Liver

    Dissection in the left side of the umbilical fossa in preparation to perform a segment III bypass. (Reprinted with permission from: La Presse Medicale. 1954;62(33):710. Figure 3. Courtesy of Masson Editeur.)